Is Morocco Safe to travel in 2020?

A melting pot of Arabic, Berber and French culture Morocco is a North African culture that packs a punch of unforgettable experiences. Famous for its storied old medinas, mint tea, ancient mosques, and delicious cuisine, there’s a world of wonder to discover in Morocco.

But you might be wondering… Morocco sure sounds amazing, but is Morocco safe?

Don’t worry, we are here to answer all of your questions!

Whether you are wondering if Morocco is safe to visit, or whether want to know if Morocco is safe for female travelers, or if Morocco is safe to live in this insider guide will answer all of your questions!

How Safe is Morocco?

Is travelling to morocco safe?  Overall, Morocco is safe to travel.

Last year, over 10 million people visited Morocco, making it the most visited country in all of Africa! Countries generally don’t hit those sort of tourism numbers if they are dangerous.

But this doesn’t mean that crime doesn’t happen, and like anywhere else in the world, you’re going to want to exercise caution and be aware of your surroundings at all times.

Let’s dive a bit deeper into the details of how to stay safe in Morocco

Is Morocco safe to visit?

Is morocco a safe place to visit? Morocco’s tourism numbers have been growing by the year and are projected to continue their impressive growth. And at the end of the day, growing tourism numbers typically indicate a safe country to travel in. 

But do bad things happen in Morocco? Absolutely.

The most common complaints in Morocco are seriously pushy people, petty theft (which can be common in the major cities).

Is it safe to visit Morocco right now?

So the burning question is it safe to travel to morocco right now? Yep it is. Morocco is. in fact, the most politically stable country in North Africa. The government has been investing more in its infrastructure to be able to attract more tourists. 

Because at the end of the day, more tourism = more money.

Like all countries, Morocco can sometimes experience political instability. Al Hociema and other cities have seen a number of demonstrations in late 2016 and 2017 due to the arrest of Berber activists and marginalization in the Rif area, a situation which is ongoing.

But at the end of the day, these demonstrations have not targeted, nor harmed tourists.

18 Top Safety Tips for Traveling to Morocco

While we all agree that Morocco is largely safe, there are always ways to make sure you are extra-safe. These are our tailored travel tips for staying safe in Morocco.

  1. If you are approached and are uncomfortable, don’t be afraid to say ‘no thank you’ and move on
  2. Shop around for guides and don’t accept tours from strangers
  3. Keep your valuables close and/or hidden
  4. Carry small bills around so you don’t have to get out larger notes
  5. Dress modestly – this is a conservative country
  6. Buddy up with fellow travelers, walking alone can make you a target
  7. If someone says they recognize you, it’s a scam!
  8. Locals may smoke hashish in public, but tourists are likely to be penalized if caught
  9. Be aware of people around you at ATMs
  10. Ask people before you take their picture – they may demand money
  11. Try memorizing routes (or drawing a map) to avoid having your phone out
  12. Drink bottled water; ask for drinks without ice
  13. Be wary of your personal space as pickpocketing can happen – take a security belt
  14. Don’t wear anything flashy – you’re more likely to be targeted for a scam
  15. Confirm the price of your taxi before you get in
  16. Be prepared to haggle, it’s expected 
  17. Take MASSIVE care when crossing roads
  18. If somebody tries to do you any kind of unsolicited service such as offering directions, they will want paying a silly amount of money

By following these Morocco travel safety tips, you’ll be able to travel to Morocco confidently so you can spend more time exploring, and less time worrying 

Keeping your money safe in Morocco

The biggest threat you’ll probably face is being pickpocketed, to be honest. No matter where you go in the world, your money (and not your actual person) is most at risk.

All travellers  are basically targets for thieves looking to make a quick bit of cash by stealing from you. But you can thwart them in their tracks with a trusty money belt.

The best way to keep your money safe is with an awesome security belt

Travelling with a money belt not only gives you peace of mind knowing that you’re pretty much protected against petty theft, but there’s a bonus: if you lose your stuff, you’ll always have this stash of cash strapped to your bod. Definitely recommend this one.

Is Morocco safe to travel alone?

Traveling by yourself is an amazing experience – especially in Morocco! But is traveling to Morocco safe if you are alone?

Every year thousands of solo travelers head to Morocco to soak in the desert and culture of this amazing country. With a great variety of hostels and cheap guesthouses – meeting other solo travelers is really very easy.

But that doesn’t mean that traveling solo in Morocco is a cake-walk.

It’s not necessarily a difficult place to travel by yourself, but you’ll have to learn a few things to ensure that you have a fun time on the road

  • Learning some basic Berber, Arabic or Darija will help you in your travels, especially with taxis or haggling. 
  • If you are thinking about traveling solo in Morocco – get yourself a phone or sim card. This will help ensure you don’t get lost and gives you peace of mind knowing you can make an emergency call if need be.
  • Making friends with fellow travelers along the way is always a good idea.
  • Depending on where you go and what city you’re in, solo travelers won’t even need a tour guide, particularly the relatively easygoing Tangier. In other places, just for peace of mind as well as of course to get the best out of your experience, a guide may be a good idea. In this modern age, you can check TripAdvisor and read blog posts to assess what places are safe to stay, eat and explore.

Generally speaking, Morocco is safe to travel alone. However, things can happen anywhere in the world so keep your wits about you.

Is Morocco safe for solo female travelers?

Is it safe to go to Morocco if you are a woman? No matter where you go, traveling solo as a woman is always going to have its risks. Some countries, more so than others.

But having said that, traveling solo as a woman in Morocco can be very safe and 100% doable! You’ll just need to exercise more caution than you would in some other countries. 

Here are a few Morocco safety tips you need to bear in mind to ensure that you actually stay safe on your trip.

  • You will most likely receive cat-calls in the medina, but the majority of harassment will most likely be ‘you’re beautiful’. Don’t interact with people who come up to you – you can do things like pretend to be filming and talking on the phone. Don’t be afraid to completely ignore/shut down a man that approaches you
  • Dressing appropriately is CRUCIAL – especially when you’re not in tourist areas. Cover your legs and shoulders, even if it’s hot, with loose, long clothes; a scarf is always very handy. You’ll still get comments, but not nearly as many.
  • Learn some basic Arabic phrases – ‘no thank you’ is a good one – to gain the respect of locals. Alwys try and walk around confidently and keep your eyes forward. Know where you’re going, have maps preloaded (or best of all, memorized), and try not to look lost. Never walk around alone at night and listen to your gut: if something looks sketchy, it probably is. Have an international sim card so you can call people.
  • Hiring a local guide is a good idea, but by no means mandatory. 

At the end of the day, it all depends on the type of traveler you are. Keep an open mind and you’ll have a great experience. It will feel a little intense at times but just remember why you’re there: to explore the country and get stuck in. Even Moroccan women themselves deal with hassle from the men – possibly even to a worse degree.

So is Morocco safe for solo female travelers? The answer is yes. It’s an awesome place to travel, as long as you’re aware, follow our safety tips and don’t do anything to put yourself at unnecessary risk  – however, if you’re new to backpacking, Morocco may be a bit intense for your first experience so we wouldn’t recommend newbie solo female travelers start here.

Is Morocco safe to travel for families?

Is it safe to travel to Morocco with your bloodline? Yes. Morocco is a family-friendly destination and a total blast for anyone traveling with kids. It’s going to be a family holiday that you’ll never forget!

Moroccans are used to having large families and traveling with children is a great way to connect with locals, who’ll be friendly and helpful to family groups in their country. Booking yourself into well-established family-friendly accommodation is a good idea.

Morocco is safe to travel for families, but before you go, just make sure your children are up to date with their vaccinations, that you have simple medications (rehydration sachets, diahorrea tablets) and make sure they don’t drink tap water.

Also be sure to advise against petting stray animals and don’t let your children stay in the sun for too long.

But overall Morocco is a phenomenal place for a family holiday.

Is it safe to drive in Morocco?

Is travel to Morocco safe for motorists? If you are in the city, whilst you can rent a car, or a motorbike – we don’t recommend it.

Morocco’s urban traffic is absolute chaos. These roads are filled with potholes, congested traffic, and super-aggressive drivers. In 2017 road accidents in Morocco accounted for 3.6% of all deaths in the country (compare that to 0.39% in the UK).

For these reasons, we’d advise only super confident and/or experienced drivers to drive in Morocco’s larger cities. 

That said, if you are looking to drive OUTSIDE of the city, there are some incredible road trips to be had.

If you find a reliable place to rent a car, and you’re in Marrakesh, you should head out for a road trip on the Tizi N Tichka Pass – it’s mostly empty and is an amazing way to see the countryside.



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